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Compared to Vitamix & Blendtec

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Shootout: OmniBlend vs Vitamix & Blendtec

9 independent reviews cover the showdown

The verdict is in
OmniBlend is comparable in performance, robustness and functionality to Vitamix and Blendtec. With OmniBlend you may have to blend a little longer to get the same result, but then again OmniBlend is quieter. Where OmniBlend beats the competition hands down is when it comes to price!
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Trial OmniBlend V for 14 days
– get your money back if the 9 food professionals below got it wrong

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OmniBlend V is the manufacturer’s latest, most popular and most versatile model and is the machine tested in all the reviews below. To get a similar blending experience to Vitamix Omniblend Australia recommends the 2 litre jug.

omniblend australia organicfoodie.com blender review

Review from: organicfoodee.com

Omniblend v. Vitamix

If you’ve never experienced the awesome power of a Vitamix blender, you’ll wonder why aficionados shell out around $500 in the US, or £450 in the UK. What could possibly be that amazing about a blender??!

Pure. Pulverizing. Power.

It will demolish anything, from grinding coffee beans to liquifying smoothies. Your kitchen will never be the same again.

So why am I going to recommend you buy an Omniblend instead? Well, it’s a new brand of high-power blender that pulverizes just as effectively… but for half the price!!!

The Omniblend is a beautifully-built machine. It has a “built to last” feel about it, with excellent attention to details like the housing for the components, ergonomics of the pitcher, and all-round professional feel.

There are three controls on the front panel: “Low,” “Medium,” and “High.” There’s also a “Pulse” function, and three timer functions so you can pound your ingredients hands-free for allotted increments of time.

The Omniblend takes whizzing to a new level, way beyond anything a regular blender does. It’s not just for smoothies (although it totally handles these with ease). My first task for my Omniblend was to transform a bag of raw mesquite powder from a roughly ground texture to a superfine powder.

The brand of mesquite powder I’d purchased wasn’t as finely powdered as my regular brand, resulting in my recipes having a less silky texture than my regular brand. Instead of discarding a whole package of raw mesquite, I tried pulverizing it in the Omniblend.

It worked perfectly! The mesquite was utterly power-pulverized, resulting in a completely different texture, and also a perceptibly sweeter flavour profile… The tiny particles are now so teeny they’re able to sink into the tongue’s taste-buds. An amazing transformation from a slightly sub-standard ingredient into a truly gourmet experience!

Job number two was to micro-chop a bag of dried dulse so that it can be sprinkled onto fresh salad greens, without the need to soak it. In the US, there are a few brands offering dulse flakes that are fine enough to use in this way, but in the UK, I’ve yet to find a ready-made packet of dulse flakes that’s ready to use as a garnish straight out of the packet.

And so, I poured a packet of raw dulse into the Omniblend, hit the “High” function, and about 3 minutes later… dulse flakes! Ready to be sprinkled, no soaking necessary. Like gomasio, but different. Delicious!

The texture of soaked dulse is nice, but it functions completely differently to little dried flakes.
This is fun. I’m loving my Omniblend experiments!

And so at this stage, I figured it’s time to do some more standard raw fare:
a hemp mylk smoothie.

1/4 cup shelled hemp seeds, a ripe banana, 1 litre water, 1 teaspoon maca, 1 tablespoon cacao, 1 fresh date, pitted
Whizzed it for a couple of minutes. Silky smooth. Ready to rock in no time at all.

And so my honest opinion?
A Vitamix is perhaps 5% more powerful than the Omniblend…
But as the Omniblend costs about 50% less than a Vitamix…

Without a doubt, I recommend getting the Omniblend. It’s a serious blender, beautifully made, will last you for decades, open whole vistas of new recipes and food experiences, and is incredible value for money.

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omniblend australia incrediblesmoothies.com blender review vitamix blendtec

Review from: incrediblesmoothies.com

My Experience Using The OmniBlend V 3 HP Blender
When it comes to green smoothies, the OmniBlend V does a fantastic job. It out performs any department store blender. It quickly and easily handles large chunks of fruit, whole leaves of kale and liquifies hard things like carrots and pineapple core perfectly. There’s no “sipping and chewing” your smoothie like you do when using cheaper blenders.

The texture of each green smoothie we blended was creamy and smooth. The consistency wasn’t quite as smooth as our Blendtec, but pretty close. We didn’t get any chunks of fruit that didn’t blend and we didn’t get large bits of leaves in our smoothies either. This blender breaks open cell walls and releases nutrients so that your body is better able to absorb them. We were very happy with the smoothie quality.

Only once did I have to use the tamper tool, and that was more my fault than the blender’s. Typically, we’d simply toss in large chunks (not whole fruits) and handfuls of leafy greens (not chopped), then hit the “High” button and the blender would pull the ingredients into the blades without having to use the tamper or hit the pulse button first. Smoothie making is easy and frustration-free with this blender!

How OmniBlend Compares To Blendtec, Vitamix and Other Blenders
The OmniBlend V 3 HP blender is very close in quality and power to the top two leaders in the blender market – Blendtec and Vitamix. Both Blendtec and Vitamix make slightly creamier smoothies, but you won’t notice the difference unless you were previously using these two blenders before the Omni. The difference is very slight and almost negligible.

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omniblend australia lexieskitchen.com blender review vitamix blendtec

Review from: lexieskitchen.com

Making the Switch: Cheryl’s Story
And Along Came the OmniBlend

To say that I have been waiting for this day is an understatement.

I have yearned for this day.

It recently came to my attention that a new contender had entered the high-powered blender arena (well I must be living under a rock because it’s been on the market for two years) and I am here to tell you a little about it.

In my opinion, no home should be without a high-powered blender. Forget the KitchenAid stand mixer and that Cuisinart food processor can wait. A high-powered blender is where it’s at and if you agree, we’d love to hear the juicy details of your love affair with yours in the comment section below.

In our switch to healthier, nutrient-dense eating, a high-powered blender made all the difference. From raw fruit and vegetables to raw nuts, the purees and smoothies these machines produce are unlike any other. The next time you visit Starbucks or Jamba Juice, take a look at the blenders sitting on their counters—Blendtec and Vitamix respectively. These are work horses, incredible machines.

The unfortunate thing is that these high-powered blenders we have grown to love—the Blendtec and the Vitamix—carry hefty price tags of $450 and up! Needless to say, cost prohibitive for many.

So, today I want to spotlight the “new guy”—the OmniBlend.

Now, I bet you’re wondering if the OmniBlend stands up to the competition? Well …

This week I put my Blentec away to spend some time test driving the OmniBlend and I must say, I am impressed. This machine gets the job done! And the best part? It retails for $250—a $190 savings over Blendtec and $199 savings over Vitamix. The only caveat is that some blend jobs may take a few additional seconds. But for close to $200 in savings, um yeah, I don’t mind blending 20-30 seconds longer. Would you? AND, having used all three machines (Blentec, Vitamix and OmniBlend), I’ve observed that each has its strengths with certain foods and mixtures.

Though I am super pleased with my Blendtec, I believe that the OmniBlend is a fine machine and quite possibly the best bang for your buck. The OmniBlend is a great machine and one I would definitely consider if I were on the market for a high-powered blender.

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omniblend australia rawfreedomcommunity.info blender review vitamix blendtec

Review from: rawfreedomcommunity.info

Presenting the Omniblend V. A Much More Affordable High Power Blender.

Ask any raw foodie, the appliance that gets the single most usage in a raw kitchen is a blender! You use it for making smoothies, dressings, sauces, soups, spreads, puddings, pie and cake fillings, ice creams… and I’m sure I must be forgetting something!

Don and I run our blender a minimum of 3 times a day. At first we just bought regular inexpensive blenders, but we gave them such a work out that they had to be replaced at least once a year (if we were lucky!) Hanging with the online raw community we had heard that high power blenders were the way to go for superior results and blender longevity, but it was hard to get our minds (and our pockets!) around paying $400-500 for a little machine.

. . . I discovered a new 3 HP blender that costs significantly less than comparable machines . . . Now I can hardly hide my excitement that we’ve discovered such a high performing blender at such a fantastic price! *doing the happy dance*

. . . We found it does a great job of completely breaking down fiber and achieving ultra smooth textures.

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omniblend australia thesunnyrawkitchen.blogspot.com blender revbiew vitamix blendtec

Review from: thesunnyrawkitchen.blogspot.com

We would like to now focus on the 3 HP level of blender. The reason: this is where the best VALUE resides as far as we are concerned, and these blenders are used mainly for the diet types we are interested in, namely the vegan and raw lifestyles.

There are only 3 blender manufacturers that we will review in this section, 2 of them being to date the most popular, with the third; a relatively new kid on the block.

Vitamix
This is the major player here. Known for high quality, durability, performance, warranty and customer service. You pay for it though. Prices in this range are $450 – $550. Strengths as noted. Weaknesses: loud (around 100 db), narrow carafe makes getting out the thicker food difficult, and they are expensive for purchase and parts.

Blendtec
Another well known company at this level. A bit on the quirky side perhaps, with the complex computerized electronics settings, unusual two pronged crushing blade rather than the more common 4 pronged cutting type as found on the Vitamix models, and shorter square type carafe. Slightly less expensive than the comparable Vitamix models ($380+), but of somewhat lower quality as well. Does a good job once the electronics are figured out. Close to the 100 db loudness level.

JTC Omniblend V
Last but by far not least, this is the newcomer to the 3 HP blender arena. Electronic like the Blendtec but much simpler to use. Substantially quieter at 85 db. Somewhat slower RPM means thorough emulsification requires a bit more time than the competition, and for that the motor should experience less stress/longer life. Has a six blade system. Comes standard with the 64 fl oz square container.

Clearly Omniblend V is the substantial Value King as it is about equal to the competition in functionality and expected durability (7 year warranty on base/motor) for a much lower cost. ($250 + $25 S&H)

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omniblend australia light-reviews.com blender review vitamix blendtec

Review from: light-reviews.com

Omniblend V 3 H.P. best blender ever?

Ever seen at Costco, BJs or Sams those 400-600 blenders? Names such as Vitamix and Blendtec. In the world of best of the best blenders, we have 3 contenders . Two you know of ( maybe) Vitamix and Blendtec and one most will not know,Omniblend. These are high H.P. high power super blenders /grinders and much more.

All are easy to clean, easy to use and SUPER high power. The 3 ferraris of the blender world, and my take after using them all side by side:

Blendtec: $375-450 great blender, backed up for 7+ years. NOISY! Will blend anything you throw at it.

Vitamix: $450-650 depending on model and options. Used in many smoothie and jamba type places. Another great blender. A bit bigger then the other 2. Backed up for 7+ years. NOISY. 2-3 HP depending on version.

Omniblend V: $250. Nope, not a misprint. 250 smackaroos. Great blender. Fits under standard counter. By my ears about 1/2 as loud as the other two backed up 7 years. 3HP.

Had a blendoff with the 3 big dogs. 5 Diff tests same on each….and got a 3 way tie honestly…..UNLESS you care about price.

Conclusion: Omniblend IS as good as the 2 more well known blenders. It just costs roughly 1/2 as much…..or less. Best bang for the buck super blender….Omniblend V. I use mine 1-2x a day or more. Love it !

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omniblend australia bestblender.ca blender review vitamix blendtec

Review from: bestblender.ca

BLENDTEC VS OMNIBLEND VS VITAMIX
The Best blenders all operate at 1000 watts or more. The Omniblend V operates at 9 amps and 950 watts, the Vitamix at 11.5 amps/ 1380 watts, and the Blendtec at 13 amps/1560 watts. The Omniblend and vitamix uses less amps and watts as the Blendtec but this does not mean it is less powerful. Just like an efficient vehicle uses less gas than a non efficient vehicle. When using these blenders they all seem to have plenty of power for all uses. Out of the three Best blenders the Vitamix and Blendtec have slightly more power than the Omniblend; the Omniblend takes a little bit longer to accomplish the same job. On the positive side the Omniblend is significantly quieter than the other two power house best blenders.

Choose Omniblend for your Best blender if:

  • you don’t want to spend +$400 on a blender
  • you want a blender that will fit under the counter
  • you do a lot of traveling with your blender
  • you would like to be able to push a button and walk away
  • you want a quieter blender

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omniblend australia juliasedibleweeds.com blender review vitamix blendtec

Review from: juliasedibleweeds.com

High powered blender
Any blender will make a green smoothie. But it’s best to use the most powerful you can afford. One that uses 1000 watts or more, like the Omniblend V, Vitamix or the Lexsun Professional Blender .

My preferred choice now is the Omniblend V – this high speed blender is 3 HP and very affordable. If I had known about the Omniblend V (which looks exactly like the Lexsun, just named differently) before I bought my Lexsun I would have bought the Omniblend V.

I am still very pleased with my Lexsun but I would have preferred to pay less.

Another well known and trusted brand is the Vitamix 5200

A high speed blender will break open the cell walls of plants, releasing antioxidants and beneficial nutrients making them easily assimilated by the body. You will also have a smoother textured liquid.

You can still use a less powerful blender but you will need to cut your ingredients into smaller pieces, blend for a longer time and accept a smoothie that might be a little more chewy.

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omniblend australia gotgreensrevolution.com blender review vitamix blendtec

Review from: gotgreensrevolution.com

OmniBlend Review
While the most common answer to the question “What blender do you recommend” is primarily Vitamix or Blendtec, both of those are a serious investment starting at ~$450. Until recently, there really wasn’t any other blender that came close.

The OmniBlend V caught our eye as a possible third option. After trying the blender, it was clear that this is not just another overpriced average kitchen blender. It clearly can compete with the big boys. OmniBlend vs Blendtec vs Vitamix, how do they compare?

Power:
Operating at 9 amps and 950 watts, the OmniBlend V has more power than most household blenders and has the ability to blend most anything. Both the Vitamix, 11.5 amps/1380 watts, and the Blendtec, 13 amps/1560 watts, have more power.

Ultimately it takes a little longer to blend things in the Omni and it can’t make blends as smooth as the Blendtec or Vitamix (although you wouldn’t know the difference if you hadn’t had a blend made in these blenders). Without a doubt the Omni will make quicker and smoother blends than most other blenders on the market.

Bottom Line:
The Vitamix and Blendtec remain as the ultimate in blending and offer more for more cost. But they can be cost prohibitive. If you can not spend the $450+ (or $329 for reconditioned) then the OmniBlend is a must look.

The OmniBlend V is a great blender. At $269it is a significant upgrade in power and features from most kitchen blenders and is well worth the money. If you want more out of your blender than what’s typical from standards like Kitchen aid, Oster, Cuisinart, etc then you cannot go wrong.

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omniblend australia productreview.com.au blender review vitamix blendtec

Reviews from: productreview.com.au

Was looking around at commercial grade blenders to use mostly for raw food and green smoothies and found the OmniBlend V. I was also looking at the Vitamix but the OmniBlend V seemed very similar from reviews I read but incredibly cheaper. I ended up getting the 2 litre model with free shipping and 3 year warranty for $315 from OmniBlend Australia and I couldn’t be happier. Super easy to clean, absolutely blitzes anything I put in it, very powerful and so cheap!
Almost exactly the same as other commercial blenders but so much cheaper.

Just got my OmniBlend. So far makes great smoothies and amazing ice cream in 30 seconds. Was going to blow $800 on a Vitamix but so far I’m more than happy with it.

Lost my Vita mix in a relationship break up – couldn’t afford a new one so got an Omniblend. All I can say is that I don’t really notice much difference from the Vita Mix. Makes me wonder the Vita Mix is so expensive? I’m really happy with it. Don’t hesitate to buy one of these!

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